A Moment of Science

Posts tagged air

October 20, 2008

 

Geese flying in "V" formation

Not So Silly Geese

Geese fly in a "V" formation mainly to save energy. Why a "V?"

August 22, 2008

 

cola

The Cleaning Power Of Soft Drinks!

Learn how soft drinks can help you clean tarnished metal...

December 12, 2007

 

Shallow pond during day

Quick, Hide in Here!

Unfortunately, lying down in shallow water and breathing through a hollow reed won't work if you need a quick getaway. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

October 17, 2007

 

Pink Balloon

Helium Balloons

Helium balloons fly because they're lighter than air. As you walk through air, it's natural to think of air as weighing nothing, though that is not the case.

June 11, 2007

 

The New York City Skyline at night.

Rocking Skyscrapers… How Safe Are They?

Have you ever been at the top of a tall skyscraper and felt the building sway? Exactly how safe are the white collars workers of big city life?

September 23, 2006

 

two pilots sitting in the cockpit

Airplane Navigation

How do modern-day pilots navigate their way at 35,000 feet?

March 8, 2006

 

candle_snuffer

Snuff

Why doesn't the flame just continue to burn underneath the bell, no matter how flat you crush it? The answer is air.

November 23, 2005

 

Falling Down

Here’s a physics classic. Suppose you drop a golf ball and a bowling ball from the Empire State Building. Which hits first? Answer? They hit at the same time. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

September 29, 2005

 

A Ping Pong Physics Trick

Here's a question for you: Do you think you could produce enough wind to blow a ping pong ball out of a funnel?

September 22, 2005

 

Slow, Smokeless Burning

Robert Frost once wrote a poem about coming across an old woodpile in the forest. In describing it he refers to the “slow, smokeless burning of decay.” What a great line of poetry. Neat part about it is, it’s also technically correct. Decay is an extremely slow burning process. Or, you could say, fire is an extremely fast decaying process. In either case, what you have is the combination of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

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