A Moment of Science

Happy World Water Monitoring Day!

Find out what World Water Monitoring Day is all about and how you can get involved.

water_sample

Photo: ilovememphis (flickr)

You can have fun with science AND make a difference in your community.

We know that you’ve been crossing the days off your calendar for weeks, but now the big moment is finally here! Happy World Water Monitoring Day, everyone!

What? You’ve never even heard of it? Here’s the 411.

World Water Monitoring Day is devoted to raising awareness about water resource protection.

We can all agree that healthy water is an essential part of our everyday life, right? That’s why it’s important to be informed and yes, even involved in testing your local water resources.

Getting Involved

Ordinary people across the country are gathering water samples for testing. It’s simple! Just grab a jar and head down to a local river, creek, pond, lake, or other watershed location!

You might think that you have to send your sample off to some high-tech laboratory, but if you visit World Water Monitoring Day’s website, you can buy a test kit or see instructions for making your own. This do-it-yourself testing is a great way to give people an active role in their environmental health and educate the community about water safety.

If you are interested in participating, just follow these 5 simple steps:

  1. Read up on the details of World Water Monitoring Day and who is involved. Share this info with friends in your community!
  2. Register the waterway that you’d like to test on the World Water Monitoring Day’s website.
  3. Prepare your testing equipment.
  4. Grab your jars and get sampling!
  5. Record your results on the website so they can be published and shared with the world!

Don’t have time for a science experiment today? September 18th may be the “official” World Water Monitoring Day, but don’t worry. Participants have until December 31st to report their results if they want to be included in the 2010 publication.

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Molly Plunkett

is a journalism student at Indiana University and an online producer for A Moment of Science. She is originally from Wheaton, IL.

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