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Don Glass

Born in Atlanta, Georgia, Don Glass has worked in public radio since 1966. From 1970 to 1990 he served as Program Manager for WFIU, becoming Special Projects Director and Senior Producer from 1990 to 2005. He has retired from fulltime employment at the University, but continues to host and produce A Moment of Science. He enjoys working with A Moment of Science and learning fascinating new facts.

Recent posts by Don

February 23, 2017

 

Ghostly fogbow over ocean

A Rainbow’s Ghostly Cousin

Fogbows are created in much the same way as normal rainbows are. The main difference is the size of the water droplets which affect the light's refraction.

February 21, 2017

 

A female Rufous Hummingbird with its beak inside a bright pink flower. The photo has captured a moment where the bird looks completely still, except for its blurred wings.

Coextinction

Coextinction is an important consideration in conservation efforts.

February 16, 2017

 

A photograph of what appears to be a pond. Green-brown algae is on the edges. In the middle of the photograph and the pond, you can see below the water's surface. What you can see is seaweed. A few dark blue spaces.

A Fishy Gaze

Green sunfish can see quite well in water that is thick and murky. How?

February 15, 2017

 

Wind blowing snow and weeds in a field.

How Cold Does It Feel?

How does the National Weather Service calculate the windchill?

February 8, 2017

 

The moon shines over a brightly lit city

Moon Tan

Can spending enough time under a very bright moon get you tan?

February 2, 2017

 

An image of a sunrise, clouds, and Haleakal, Maui

Sunrise, Sunset

Why does it seem like sunsets are longer than sunrises?

January 30, 2017

 

microwave light pours out in mesh pattern

Is Microwaving Safe for Food?

It's time to zap the myth that microwaving food somehow damages or irradiates it.

January 25, 2017

 

A sun set over the Pacific Ocean in California.

The Sun Just Blew Up!

How do you know the sun didn't just explode? We aren't talking about the everyday, run-of-the-mill controlled explosion the sun is always doing, but a big boom.

January 23, 2017

 

Swans floating on the water form share a heart-shaped embrace.

Animal Scandals

Swans, often used as symbol of love and fidelity, aren't as monogamous as people think.

January 20, 2017

 

Nihon-Ama-Gaeru Japanese Tree Frog

How to Heave Your Guts

You've heard the expression "to heave your guts" used to refer to vomiting. In the case of frogs and toads, "heaving your guts" can have a literal connotation.

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