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A Moment of Science

Archive for September 2003

September 27, 2003



As in electrolysis, that is–the hair removal process involving mild doses of electrical current used to kill hair follicles.

September 27, 2003


Whole Grains

In this Moment of Science we discuss the importance of whole grains, as well as what they are in the first place.

September 27, 2003


Cooked Tomatoes are Better than Raw Ones?

It’s commonly said that cooked fruits and vegetables are not as good for you as raw ones. Is this statement true? Find out on today’s Moment of Science.

September 27, 2003


Bombproof Luggage Container

To be able to withstand a bomb blast, a luggage container must be made of pretty strong stuff. The magic ingredient in the best-known bombproof container is called Glare, which is short for “reinforced glass.”

September 27, 2003


To Immunize or Not to Immunize…

Vaccines consist of mild doses of disease-causing bacteria or virus that trigger the creation of antibodies that fight infection.

September 27, 2003


The Anatomy of a Flame

You can think of a flame as being like a kind of tent. Heat melts the candle’s waxy fuel, and turns it into a gas. This fuel gas floats away from the wick to fill the inside of the flame’s tent.

September 27, 2003


Big Fido Is Watching You

That’s when you have a tiny, encased computer chip inserted under the skin of your dog or cat. Why?All sorts of information can be encoded on the chip, from the name of the animal’s owner–useful in case the animal gets lost–to information about its medical history a vet might need.

September 27, 2003


The Leatherback Turtle, Part 1

Unlike other sea turtles, the Leatherback can survive in cold waters.

September 27, 2003


Seeing Inside Rocks

Wouldn’t it be nifty if there was a way we could see into rocks without having to break them? Just think of it. If we could see inside of rocks without having to slice them open, then perhaps we could see into rocks on other planets like Mars. And maybe then we could detect forms of life inside these rocks.

September 27, 2003


The Hand Speaks

Does hand movement while talking help one's memory? Find out on this Moment of Science.

September 27, 2003


A dark, yellow sky.

It’s Raining Frogs And Fish, Literally!

It may not have occurred in your neck of the woods, but all across the globe people are reporting that small animals are falling from the sky!

September 27, 2003


True Love and Garlic

Garlic-lovers, and the unfortunate people who love them, are well aware of the reeking breath that’s caused by the tiniest bit of garlic. So why don’t products like toothpaste and mouthwash help lessen the stench? What makes garlic so persistently stinky?

September 27, 2003


Buckminster Fuller and His Geodesic Dome

R. Buckminster Fuller was a twentieth century scientist, philosopher, inventor, and was also named a great architect.

September 27, 2003



In particular, the cervix seems to be at risk, one reason why an annual Pap smear is important.

September 27, 2003


Agent Orange

This discovery led many scientists to believe that the dioxin content of Agent Orange was responsible for serious diseases suffered by Vietnam Veterans and the Vietnamese people.

September 27, 2003


When Winter Is the Best Driving Season

Although ice roads are plowed like regular roads, they offer a different driving experience. Because ice has give, a wave is created under it as the vehicle drives on top.

September 27, 2003


Mosquito Repellants–How They Work, and Are They Safe?

What turns the mosquito on are goodies like carbon dioxide, heat, moisture, and lactic acid, which is secreted in sweat. These four elements make our bodies prime targets for the mosquito’s bite.

September 27, 2003


Battle of the Bugs

The ultraviolet light is supposed to attract mosquitoes against an electrified grid, which then zaps them. Well, it’s true that plenty of mosquitoes are attracted into your backyard by the light, but once the mosquitoes catch a whiff of you, they ignore the light completely.

September 27, 2003


The Dirt about Desert Soil

In the desert, the absence of water means little or no chemical weathering can take place. Instead, erosion, frost, sedimentation, and the huge temperature fluctuations between day and night break down the rocky surface into sand or gravel.

September 27, 2003


The Battle over Iron

We all know we need iron to live. How else would our blood carry oxygen to our lungs? And cells need iron in order to multiply. The problem is that our cells aren’t the only ones who need iron in order to thrive. Cancer cells and microorganisms like E. Coli and staph need iron too.

September 27, 2003


Changing Gears

In our high-tech world it’s easy to forget the simpler things. Take a bicycle, for instance. No engine, no computerized braking system, no fancy fuel injection: all you need is air in the tires and off you go. Simple, that is, until you take a closer look at bicycles with multiple speeds. How do all […]

September 27, 2003


Birds v. Squirrels

What do birds, squirrels, and chili peppers have to do with one another? Find out on this Moment of Science.

September 27, 2003


Lemmings Love Life

Do lemmings really follow each other off a cliff to their death? No, but there are mysteries surrounding the rodents. Over the years, there have been many tales of these Arctic rodents voluntarily jumping off cliffs and plummeting into the sea.

September 27, 2003


A large group of maggots devouring a dead possum

Maggots: an Investigator’s “Star Witness”

Grisly as it sounds, by surveying the insects in and around a corpse, forensic scientists can help determine how long ago a victim was murdered.

September 27, 2003


How Eggs Get Their Color

Depending on the species, bird eggs can be any color ranging from chicken’s plain white to a robin’s blue, streaked, spotted, bright, pale, and anything in between. Today, on a Moment of Science, we take a look at some of the reasons this might be the case. But first, how do eggs get their color? […]

September 27, 2003



Today’s word is Lactobacillus bulgaricus; or, if you’d like an easier word of the day: yogurt.

September 27, 2003


Hoofing It

In the wild, unshod hooves grow downwards approximately two-tenths of an inch per month. A wild horse’s natural daily activities, however, wear away the hoof at roughly the same rate, maintaining the proper balance between hoof wall and sole.

September 27, 2003


Can the Dead Move?

The chemicals that cause this reaction are stored in our nerve endings, and when we die, they’re gradually released.

September 27, 2003


How Two-way Mirrors Work

Like all mirrors, two-way mirrors have a reflective coating. However, while the reflecting coating on regular mirrors is dense and returns all the light that strikes its surface, the reflective coating on two-way mirrors is more sparse.

September 27, 2003


A Cooler for the Sahara

Produce from family farm plots lasts much longer than before, meaning that families don’t need to send girls out every day to sell produce, but can send them to school instead.

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