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Archive for September 2003

September 27, 2003

 

Get It?

Did you ever wonder what occurs inside your body when something funny happens? What is this thing we have in our brains that makes us say “ha-ha” when someone slips on a banana? One way to find out is to watch the brain laugh. That’s what Dartmouth neuroscientist William Kelley did. He and his team […]

September 27, 2003

 

A model of the uterus

Positions of the Uterus

Learn about all the various positions of the uterus on this Moment of Science.

September 27, 2003

 

Bouncing Balls

Air molecules are naturally elastic–they don’t stick together like water molecules, but rather bounce off each other in the open.

September 27, 2003

 

Lose Weight Fast

Any motion takes energy to perform. And little motions like rearranging things on your desk or stretching your back, if you do them all the time, start to add up.

September 27, 2003

 

Hit Me with Your Best Shot

It works kind of like a soccer net. When you kick the ball into the net, it absorbs the energy of the ball and eventually stops its forward motion.

September 27, 2003

 

Motion Sickness

During voyage of the Beagle, Charles Darwin was often overcome by seasickness and discovered that “nothing but lying in [his] hammock did any good.”This remedy–lying down with eyes shut–is one of the most effective for treating motion sickness.

September 27, 2003

 

Is Modern Medicine Working?

Modern medicine, along with better living conditions and healthier diets, enables many people to live into their seventies and eighties. Deaths due to infectious diseases like smallpox and polio have declined, and formerly fatal conditions like diabetes and heart disease can be kept in check.

September 27, 2003

 

Pisa Shoes

If you have good posture, your bones will carry you the way a skyscraper’s frame carries the weight of the building. If not, you may end up more like the leaning tower of Pisa. While there are many routes to bad posture, high heels are certainly one of the most popular.

September 27, 2003

 

Girls Love a Glowing Head

In the animal kingdom, much like in the world of humans, there are many techniques that animals will use in order to attract mates. Parrots, for example, have glowing heads.

September 27, 2003

 

Salmon and Riparian Vegetation

Learn about the love-relationship between salmon and riparian vegetation on this Moment of Science.

September 27, 2003

 

Freeze Drying

If you’ve ever been to the Air and Space Museum in Washington DC, perhaps you’ve sampled the kind of freeze-dried ice cream astronauts eat during space missions. A stiff, dry square, the freeze-dried version tastes just like ice cream, except that it isn’t cold, and has no moisture.

September 27, 2003

 

Pig stands in mud.

Pigs ‘N Truffles -The Seductive Appeal Of Chocolate

Truffles are a French culinary delicacy and a fungus that grows deep in the ground. Has it ever occurred to you how odd it is that we use pigs to find them?

September 27, 2003

 

Jamming A Moment of Science

Now and then you hear about radio frequencies being jammed. In this Moment of Science, we’ll discuss how this occurs.

September 27, 2003

 

What is Endometriosis?

Because these growths are pieces of uterine lining, they do what uterine lining normally does every month, the tissue grows and tries to be shed.

September 27, 2003

 

Scarlet Fever

Toxins produced by the nasty streptococci bacteria are released at the site of infection and are absorbed into the infected person’s blood stream.

September 27, 2003

 

Cheating Cheetahs

This is known as a genetic bottleneck, and it meant that the remaining cheetahs were forced to breed with their relatives.

September 27, 2003

 

Lanugo Hairs

Some babies are born with a full head of thick, colorful hair, while other babies are born with very thin, hard-to-see hair.

September 27, 2003

 

Oy Vein!

Varicose veins in the legs occur when the valves in a vein near the surface of the skin malfunction. Valves usually keep blood from flowing backwards in the vein once it’s been pumped towards the heart.

September 27, 2003

 

How Tall Are You?

This means that the water pumping in and out of them also provides them with nutrients and enables them to eliminate waste products. If you’ve ever wished you were just a little bit taller, try measuring your height in the morning. It might make all the difference.

September 27, 2003

 

Thinking about Aging

As you may already know, heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in people who are older than sixty-five. What’s more, there’s a growing body of evidence that emotional stress can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

September 27, 2003

 

Wanted: Nightcrawlers Take the Bait

For some people, the word "worm" means "money".

September 27, 2003

 

Frog Venom

Did you know that frog venoms are becoming more and more prevalent in some of today's most vital medications? Find out more on this Moment of Science.

September 27, 2003

 

Something’s Rotten at AMOS

Many of us have heard that if you soak a tooth in soda for a few days it will begin to soften. Well, it isn’t true, but it doesn’t mean you can drink all the soda you want without it causing tooth problems. While soda contains citric and phosphoric acids, so do plenty of other foods and beverages.

September 27, 2003

 

Maggots festing one of two possums in a creek

Maggot Therapy

Before modern antibiotics, doctors sometimes relied on an unusual, but effective therapy for keeping wounds from getting infected. Yep, you guessed it: maggots.

September 27, 2003

 

The Most Successful Species on Earth

For many scientists, a species’ success is measured by sheer numbers. In that case, the most successful species known to man is a type of bacterium known as S-A-R-11, or SAR-11 for short. Scientists estimate that there are two-hundred and forty times a billion billion billion SAR11 cells floating around in the oceans. Now that […]

September 27, 2003

 

Is It Brain Death or a Coma?

On this Moment of Science, we discuss the difference between brain death and a coma.

September 27, 2003

 

Stalk-eyed flies

In the case of the African stalk-eyed fly, where the males are like hammer head sharks with their eyes extended on long stalks, sometimes measuring one and half times the length of their bodies, long stalks are an indicator of better genes.

September 27, 2003

 

Why Build an Igloo?

Surprisingly, snow makes good insulation. In physics, an insulator is a material that does not conduct heat very well, like an oven mitt.

September 27, 2003

 

Cyanide Bombs

There is a war going on between a certain tropical butterfly, Heliconius sara, and its only food source, the passion vine. This war involves chemical warfare. More precisely, the plant arms itself with cyanide bombs that are rather useful in getting rid of most insect pests.

September 27, 2003

 

How Now, Mad Cow

This strange disease was first noticed in the UK when British cows were infected by feed containing tainted sheep material. How could you spot a mad cow?

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